The Importance of Vision in Fiction

Visionary fiction is a category of fiction that brings a strong vision of the world, points a way forward through tough times. When fiction is billed as visionary it seems to elicit excitement or groans. Bestsellers or flops. And this is usually because it is so easy for visionary fiction to stray into preachiness and soapboxing. But most fiction that catches on to become a hit actually is visionary in some way, such as the way dystopic YA lit helps people explore a destroyed world, fulfilling an important function in our troubled society. I would go so far as to say that all good fiction is visionary.

Vision of a Fictional World

Visionary FictionMy fiction is shelved as speculative supernatural or high-concept fantasy, and has been compared to fantasy sci-fi authors Ursula K. Le Guin and Ray Bradbury. But it has a distinctly spiritual flavor because of its cosmological speculative elements about how the world might be knit together—portals between worlds, visions of what kinds of fantastic beings might be out there, that kind of thing. Even though I never aim to tell people what to think with my fiction, I did realize after a lot of reading and writing that I don’t like stories that don’t have some kind of depth to them, emotionally, spiritually, even intellectually. I now believe that the vision of a fictional world, or of its author, is one of the most important components in a great novel, though it often works best when it is behind the scenes, woven into the story where you can’t see the threads.

How can writers impart vision to their fiction? I think you do it by following your heart. Whatever is deep inside you, whatever is really important to … Continue reading

Visionary Fiction: An Act of Love

Guest Post by Alissa Lukara

The Transformational Writers website, like the Visional Fiction Alliance, arose out of my calling to provide a place of support and exploration for writers who aim to explore the evolution of consciousness, alternative realities and write stories that make a positive difference.

I wanted to create a haven for visionary writers who were taking the deep dive into the waters of transformation by offering them one on one mentoring, a blog on transformational writing, online and local classes, and individual and group retreats.

Why? On a selfish level, I want to read more books like that.

I  also believe that we as a reading public need stories that show us how people transform –  stories that can literally shift a reader’s consciousness as they accompany the main character on a heart and soul-opening journey to embrace authentic power and dive into new and alternative realities and expanded states of awareness.  Visionary Fiction and Memoir lets readers know that we can traverse a passage through the fire of change into a new way of being and a deepened understanding of the love and spirit at our core.

One key to the transformational experience inherent in Visionary Fiction is that while the stories seem to be about extraordinary events, what happens in these books is possible, even probable. While the fantasy genre might take us to imaginary worlds, the consciousness presented in Visionary Fiction resonates for many of us as if it could occur today.

The books may not convey traditional three-dimensional “possible.” However, in the multi-dimensional world I believe we are all being called to acknowledge and embody, the spiritual and alternative realities Visionary Fiction writers convey in their stories are as real as any 3D reality.  If we’re honest, for many visionary authors, it’s … Continue reading

Revealing the Magical

MagicalToday’s post, Revealing the Magical, concludes last week’s post, The Visionary Perspective, in which I attempt to distinguish between the genres of visionary fiction and magical realism—how they differ and where they may overlap.

Magical Realism

The genre of magical realism blends the supernatural or what is typically unseen by human consciousness with the natural and familiar world by using the existence of fantasy elements in the real world. This is not done by inventing new worlds as fantasy books do, but in revealing the magical in this world.

The magical is a common and ordinary occurrence in my book, The Lioness of Brumley Hall, and harnessing these magical elements is one of its key themes. Political critique is often a main focus or subtext used to challenge the reality of established viewpoints. Cultural clashes are part of this critique. The Lioness does this by briefly highlighting the political/cultural clashes between China and Tibet and accessing the Celtic mythology of the Faerie.

Magical realism may meld the unseen and visible realities together but this does not necessarily lead to a more evolved transformative consciousness or understanding of our true reality of an integrated Universal holism.

Magical realists take for granted that we live within both worlds as an integrated reality but the focus for magical realists is to challenge existing consensual physical reality, not transcend it per se.

One of the main lesson my grandmother character teaches her grandchildren is that magic does not necessarily make one more conscious and aware which connects magical realism with the necessity of an evolving consciousness to reach a more in tune … Continue reading

The Visionary Perspective

The Visionary Perspective

I suspect many of you, like me, struggle to define visionary fiction, not to mention how it differs from magical realism.

In today’s post, The Visionary Perspective, and next week’s post, Revealing the Magical, I will make an attempt to distinguish between the two genres—how they differ and where they may overlap.

An Accurate Place to Land

For me, an integration of visionary metaphysical and magical realism seems to be the most accurate place to land—a combination of the embrace of esoteric wisdom emphasizing the human transformative capacity and the hidden mystery of the magical elements breaking through into ordinary “real” life.

This type of fiction, according to Italian writer, Massimo Bontempelli, attempts to change the collective consciousness by “opening new mythical and magical perspectives on reality”.

The Unseen Within the Visible

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Visionary Fiction Through The Lens of Perception

If you’ve followed recent posts at VFA, you’re aware of the ongoing discussion about what distinguishes visionary fiction from other genres listed under the umbrella of speculative fiction, including sci-fi and metaphysical.

Although our internal deliberations and debates have led to some interesting revelations and “ah ha” moments, I figured it was time to invite in an outside source to shine fresh light on the enduring conundrum.

Enter publisher, writer, editor, and lecturer Hal Zina Bennett.

The Puzzle of Visionary Fiction

Visionary Fiction and The Lens of PerceptionI contacted Hal Zina Bennett because he contemplated the rise of visionary fiction as a new book category as far back as 2002, and I haven’t yet found anyone who’s come close to addressing the genre with such expertise (though he doesn’t lay claim to that distinction).

As he says in a previous post at VFA, The Puzzle of Visionary Fiction: “I think I have some understanding of spiritual non-fiction, and have written one moderately successful ‘visionary fiction’ novel, but sometimes I’m not sure I really ‘get’ visionary fiction at all.”

That post was written over a year ago, and, since the “puzzle of visionary fiction” is still missing some key pieces, I called upon—or should I say pestered?—Mr. Bennett again, hoping that during the interim he had located a few of those elusive shape-shifting dodgers.

The Lens of Perception

Visionary Fiction and The Lens of PerceptionWhat follows is Mr. Bennett’s response to my “visionary” query:

The too obvious answer to your last post/email may be that visionary fiction like beauty is in the eyes of the beholder.

Folk stories, specifically stories I’m familiar with from the Zuni and Hopi story tellers, easily mix spiritual visions, fantasy, magic, and everyday reality. Is that visionary fiction?  

Well, here’s the long explanation: A young Hopi woman, in her 20s or early 30s, I guessed, came up to … Continue reading

Book Signings Can Be Boring So Create An Event Instead

authorevent As an author maybe you’ve been there. You sit behind a table with a stack of books in front of you and wait. That’s it; you wait. Why not liven things up a   bit?

Sponsor an event instead of a simple book signing. Think an interactive author appearance…engage your audience and connect with readers.

As long as you’re at it, why confine your event to a bookstore?  Why not approach a local hardware store, gift shop or library branch to host your event?   You can even leave some of your autographed books there on consignment.

Events can get boring too so here are 10 suggestions of things you might use to make your event more fun:

  • Make the event an event by asking another author (or two) from the area to join you and you can combine your events.
  • Don’t just read from your book tell a story about writing it or what inspired you. Share an anecdote or two about the experience.
  • Devise a quiz or contest for the audience. Test their knowledge of your subject or the contents of one of your previous books.
  • Have you considered a presentation or slideshow…maybe a video. If you have a book trailer why not present it? Talk about any upcoming events.
  • I’ve read fiction that has blended known songs into the story. Create a playlist that goes along with the novel.
  • You might write DIY or non-fiction books or even include a recipe or special treat in your story. Try a simple demo or share the results of the recipe with the audience.
  • Ask someone to interview you. Invite a friend or colleague who knows your book and writing to be … Continue reading
  • Writing Visionary Fiction Within an Historical Setting

    Guest Post by author Leonide Martin

    Authors of Visionary Fiction encounter a special challenge when their stories take place in historical settings.  Each historic period shapes its cultures through a combination of forces, from evolution to technology and climate.  Within cultures, the unique chronicle of events, resources, worldview, and spirituality become defining forces. When cultures interact, these forces are even more complex.  Those of us who engage with historical fiction are usually driven by a passion for the culture and time period, and we want to keep our stories authentic.  We often have characters who are actual historic persons, and must learn what we can about their personalities, goals, and actions.  Inferring their underlying motives and passions may be difficult, depending on how much written information is available.

    How does an author enter the world of ancient cultures?  We can use imagination to recreate how life might have been in historic Greece, Egypt or Britain drawing from research and literature.  While documents are essential, often there are information gaps.  Authors face missing links about events or cultural practices, especially personal facts about historical people and the others who surrounded them.  It can be a real challenge to gather information about an historical person’s emotions and intentions.  We can draw inferences from documentation in historical sources about what they did – but is that enough to craft a story and flesh out a personality?

    To me, historical documents and records, and the inferences authors can draw from them, are not sufficient.  This is where the visionary process comes in.  We can use our psychic abilities to envision and enter distant worlds and unfamiliar societies.  Some call this time traveling, or undertaking a shamanic journey.  In the author’s inner experience, she or he actually visits a far-away time and place.

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    Selling Visionary Fiction Isn’t So Different: Just Ask a Few Questions

            Guest post by Lynnette Phillips

    Lynnette Phillips

    As with anything, thinking of the whole picture slows me down, so at first I was momentarily stumped when I started to think of marketing Visionary Fiction. But     after all, I’ve been a book blogger, book marketer and author service provider for years, so I started to ask myself some basic questions and immediately I was       giving myself a mental forehead slap (as in calling yourself a fool) and got down to business.

    Question: How’s Visionary Fiction different from what I’ve been marketing?

    Answer: It isn’t different in the marketing sense of things. It’s fiction. It does, however, have several sub‑genres like paranormal, fantasy, supernatural…so start with the basics and away we go!

    Q: What do readers trust when deciding what to read?

    A: Word‑of‑mouth. Word‑of‑mouth is one of the strongest marketing tools available (and money smart, too). Readers wonder if someone else has read this book or author’s writing and enjoyed it. They look for reviews.

    How do you get these reviews? Approach book bloggers – be aware though that there is such a demand to have a book’s image and review appear on an influential site that you will want to ‘court’ the most prominent bloggers. Become a recognizable name to them.

    First do your homework: Check web analytics, look for bloggers who will review your genre or sub‑genre, check their availability—their schedule might not permit them to review another book for several months. Peruse their blog; how do they treat the books and authors they review?

    Also, engage them on Twitter (microblogs and posts have definite advantages), ask a question or … Continue reading

    “Buen Camino!”

    “Buen Camino!”

    These words offer wishes of good fortune to travelers of the Camino, or ‘The Way,’ – a pilgrimage on the Compostela de Santiago trail that runs from southern France through northern Spain. A friend from my writing critique group recently invited me to trek this 500 mile path with her. I was excited and intrigued at the prospect.

    I wondered what it was about the Camino that had me so enthralled. The Camino pilgrimage is a physical challenge, but it is primarily a spiritual journey, one that thousands have traveled since medieval times. Daily hiking compels the traveler to interact with the land and its many ancient sacred sites along the way, as well as to inwardly focus on their own interior soul landscape. The pilgrimage is reminiscent of the Celtic Imram, the name given to the physical voyages and counterpart soul quests of the ancient Celtic peoples of Ireland and Britain. The Camino invitation brought back memories of one of the most important Imrams of my life – my journey to Glastonbury, England. It was a sojourn that eventually fueled the inspiration for my Goddess of the Stars and the Sea novels.

    Glastonbury, the ancient isle of Avalon, is the setting in my favorite novel, the classic The Mists of Avalon, penned by Marion Zimmer Bradley. The story tells      the Arthurian Grail legend from the feminine viewpoint of Morgaine, King Arthur’s half sister and priestess of the Goddess. Bradley’s novel has been a best      seller for many years because it touches the collective psyche of our times. Her novel characterizes the re-emergence of the … Continue reading

    Billion $ Market for Visionary Fiction?

    visionary-foresight-28034198

    I write visionary fiction.

    Unfortunately, mainstream agents and publishers do not recognize visionary fiction as a genre. In fact, they have dubbed it “the kiss of death” with the flat of their swords.

    In the past, visionary fiction was heavy on preaching and light on storytelling, so it deserved temporary banishment to the time-out corner.

    But enough is enough. The majority of today’s visionary fiction writers have mastered page-turning plot and in-depth characterization, with the bonus of writing fiction that uplifts and transforms.

    There’s a need – no, a yearning – these days for what visionary fiction has to offer.

    Need convincing?

    Let me introduce you to an organization called GATE (Global Alliance for Transformational Entertainment), “an evolving community of creative, business and technical professionals in entertainment, media, and the arts — and the interested public — who realize the vital and expanding role media and entertainment play in creating our lives, and who aspire to consciously transform those domains for the benefit of all.”

    Each year, GATE holds a public event for networking between media professionals with transformational values. GATE 2 was held on February 4, 2012 with a standing room only crowd of 2,400 at the Saban Theater in Beverly Hills. One of the featured speakers was sociologist and author of Cultural Creatives, Dr. Paul Ray.

    In the video below, Dr. Ray presents a convincing argument that transformational entertainment has a billion dollar market just waiting to be tapped.

    You are what you read, what you see, and what you hear. Where you put your attention determines … Continue reading