Crowdsourcing a Novel of The Resurrection

Resurrection

Here’s your chance to help out a  fellow Visionary Fiction Alliance member with his MA thesis and have a little fun in the process. Robert Springer invites you to, “Add your voice. Explore your new life,” by journaling about your resurrection.

In Resurrectorium 1920, the dead are being given back their lives, but they must find their own happiness.

Robert’s instructions for participation are as follows:

This is my MA thesis, a “crowd-sourced” novel where other writers can write portions of the story. If you participate, you write as if you are keeping a journal upon awakening in a hospital-like Resurrectorium. “You have been resurrected from the dead.” These words welcome you to a different world. It’s a beautiful world. People are friendly. There is work, but not drudgery. Money, but not riches. Eternal life for some, perfect health for all. There are two kinds of resurrected life: Zoë life, the eternal life of God, and Bios life, the life you have now but with perfect health and 1,000 years to reach Zoë life. You can write as a Zoë teacher who has stood in the presence of God in heaven, or you can write as a Bios who, other than perfect health, is exactly as we all are now. But not everyone is happy.

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Literature and the Flow of Consciousness – Part 2

seven states of consciousness

This is part 2 in a series about Maharishi Mahesh Yogi.  Author, MR Neer addresses some questions that are related to the Yogi’s theory about the connection between literature and the evolution of consciousness.  Please read the previous post where MR Neer offers some insight about literature, how we experience it, and how it develops human consciousness. 

How does literature affect the writer, reader, and society?

Now from this foundation, I have identified 10 of Maharishi’s key ideas about literature.

consciousness

For the Writer:
1) Silence. The creative process depends on the inner silence of the writer. The aspects of a piece of writing “all come together in a very beautiful, connected manner if there is silence deep within.” By silence, he means thought arising from the state near or at the level of pure consciousness – the quietest level of the mind where all activity has settled down. He insists that the power of literature lies in “the purity of the writer, in the purity of the consciousness of the writer who is able to bring in an ocean in a drop, … [who] naturally comprehends the totality on any surface value of a thing.” He explains that when a writer maintains that simple, silent awareness, it has all possibilities in it.

2) Flow. Good writing is not so much about … Continue reading

Visionary Fiction: The Call to Awakening, An Interview with Rea Nolan Martin – Part 2

This is part two of Robin Gregory’s interview with author Rea Nolan Martin. For part 1, please click here.

Robin: “It is entirely possible that behind the perception of our senses, worlds are hidden of which we are unaware,” Albert Einstein said. Some of your characters have contact with non-physical beings. Can you talk about what lies beyond “the perception of our senses”?

Rea: Ha! Everything! Our senses are keys that unlock doors to the next chamber, wherein another locked door awaits us, and another, etc. The secrets of the universe are contained in a tabernacle at the epicenter of existence. The observable “seen” world, however, is full of clues if we have “eyes to see” and “ears to hear” as is repeated over and over again in ancient sacred texts. But we have to attune ourselves to that world, which means constantly adjusting and refining our spiritual antennae to new and evolving signals.

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Visionary Fiction: The Call to Awakening, An Interview with Author, Rea Nolan Martin -Part 1

An interview with author Rea Nolan Martin, author of The Anesthesia Game. A collection of Rea’s most inspirational essays, WALKING ON WATER, will be released in 2016. 

By Robin Gregory

Mother of two sons, professor, editor, novelist, and regular contributor to Huffington Post, Rea Nolan Martin is a visionary writer, one who writes stories of transformation and self-realization. “I have always believed in miracles, and over the years that belief has not diminished. In fact, at this point, I have grown to expect them.” She agreed to talk with me about her life, writing, publishing, and her new novel, “The Anesthesia Game.”

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Visionary Fiction and Truth

BY ELIZABETH BECKETT Truth is relative. It depends where you are standing, and when. A thousand different versions of one story can all be right. So how do we make sense of it all? By finding your own truth – what resonates with you and you feel implicitly to be on your frequency. Some people think that my books are astounding, and others think that they are rubbish. But I must persevere for the readers whose personal truth frequencies are attuned with what I write, because that is powerful. Continue reading

The Wounded Healer: the Greek Myth of Human Evolution

Multi-faceted visionary craftsman Esme Ellis has been a supporter and contributor to the Visionary Fiction Alliance almost from its inception. She has written four books; Pathway Into Sunrise, Clea and the Fifth Dimension, This Strange and Precious Thing, and Dreaming Worlds Awake. Here are some of her musings amidst samples of her visionary art. Continue reading

The Anesthesia Game and Visionary Fiction – guest post by Rea Nolan Martin

(Editor’s note – Oftentimes our stories are culled from our life experiences – painful, joyful, mystical, paranormal – and forged into Visionary Fiction. Author Rea Nolan Martin tells her tale of how such an experience shaped her newest novel.)

The Anesthesia Game final coverThe story behind The Anesthesia Game is very close to my heart. The fifteen-year-old protagonist, Sydney, suffers a life-threatening illness that requires frequent spinal procedures for which she undergoes regular anesthesia. Having spent years accompanying my own child through such procedures, I understood from page one the spectrum of courage (or cowardice) my characters would likely exhibit, patient and family members alike. Having said that, this story is far from a memoir. The personalities of my characters vary greatly from those of my own family. I constructed the characters from scratch, asking myself—what if not one, but all of them suffered some kind of affliction, real or imagined? What if, in order to manage their afflictions, each one of them was also under the influence of her own version of anesthesia? How would they manage to help each other? How would they progress? Or would they? Who would lose a life and who would find one? After the first 100 pages or so, the characters showed me the way.

As a writer of Visionary Fiction, I imagined the child’s disease and the resulting anesthesia, not as a means of sedating her life, so much as awakening it. After all, what value do negative experiences contain if not to hone us and/or those around us? The problem is, at what price the experience? The risks in this story are as high as they can … Continue reading

What Is Women’s Visionary Fiction?  Part I – Guest Post By Mary Mackey

Women’s Visionary Fiction is not a new type of Visionary Fiction. It has been around for decades if not centuries. In fact, for all of recorded history (and thousands of years before writing existed) women have been associated with visions, mystical experiences, spiritual powers, magic, the ability to bring new life into the world, heal the sick, and speak to the dead.

When women authors finally cracked the Paper Ceiling of Publishing in the early 1970’s, they began to draw on their visionary heritage as they struggled for cultural recognition and spiritual identity.

The best of Women’s Visionary Fiction is not preachy or didactic. Mystical, flowing, beautifully crafted, it draws on folk traditions and esoteric sources as it creates new worlds, explores the after-life, and evokes other states of consciousness and other realities. Yet many of the early examples, fine they are, still remain unknown except to a small audience of readers.

Cover of Waterlilly by Ella Deloria

For example, in 1940, Native American author Ella Deloria wrote Waterlilly, a visionary novel that takes as its subject Lakota (Sioux) culture before the Lakota had contact with Europeans. This fascinating recreation of Lakota rituals, culture, and spiritual life, was not published until 1988, nearly twenty years after Deloria’s death.

In the past half century, women have written visionary fiction about witches, midwives, herbal healers, priestesses, goddesses, fairies, oracles, and angels. In fact, sometimes the authors themselves have been witches, midwives, herbal healers, and priestesses. Take for example Starhawk, San Francisco’s most famous witch. Her novel The Fifth Sacred Thing (Bantam, 1993), is a post-apocalyptic vision of the … Continue reading