How I Became Inspired to Write a Visionary Fantasy Series – Stella Brians

New England Inspiration

I grew up in Norwich, which is a little town in Connecticut rich in beauty and in history. Old buildings lined most streets, and are still used as existing businesses. The Norwich Post Office was built in 1905, in the Classical Revival design. I attended Norwich Free Academy, a high school mainly composed of very old and beautiful buildings. Perhaps the most notable is the Slater Museum. The museum has always kept a variety of different art pieces, but what always stuck out to me was the plaster cast collection of Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and Italian-Renaissance sculptures. I lived down the street from my school, which was very close to the Yantic Cemetery, and the Indian Leap Falls. The Yantic Cemetery was special, because it was built in the Victorian era, back when they used to design graveyards like gardens. Pathways, trees, and aesthetically pleasing graves were only a few of the lovely features. I would often come to the graveyard, to walk and have some time alone to think. Sometimes, I felt as though the tall trees could hear my thoughts. It is one of the most peaceful places I have ever been to, and there is something about it that does not make one fear death nearly as much.

Norwich CT Main Street, New England     Slater Museum      Continue reading

Esme Ellis – In Memoriam

In Memoriam

October 2016

Esme Ellis

esme

We are sad to announce that one of our members, Esme Ellis, has passed away. Esme has been with us since the start of the VFA.  She has written four books; Pathway Into Sunrise, Clea and the Fifth DimensionThis Strange and Precious Thing, and Dreaming Worlds Awake.

Esme Ellis started out life as a visual artist.  At age 11, she earned scholarships to the junior art department of the Sheffield College of Art and the senior art college at 14. At 17,  sculpture and ceramics became her preferred focus of study. She won another scholarship to The Royal College of Art in London. She spent a year in Rome working on her studies and visiting many museums and galleries.

After having moved to Bath in 1975, she headed spiritual and meditation awareness meetings in her home.  She also expressed herself with painting and writing. Her journey to becoming a writer was an organic process and almost reads like a visionary fiction story:

“After virtually forty years of training and practising the art of sculpture, my life took a surprising new course. It is said that a Shaman must endure some physical calamity – a fall from a high rock face, breaking every bone in their body – be taken apart and reassembled again – before discovering their true power. The same could be said of a writer. From the most earthy, hands-on, three dimensional form of creative expression, sculpture, I was led through a devastating illness … Continue reading

The Hero’s Journey and its Connection to Visionary Fiction

HERO’S JOURNEY

What is the Hero’s Journey, and why do so many visionary writers like George Lucas use it to craft their stories? To answer that question, we need to understand where the Hero’s Journey comes from.

Joseph  Campbell recognized that myths around the world follow a similar template. He referred to this as monomyth. The hero’s path consists of 17 stages.

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As it would be too lengthy to explain all the stages in one post, let’s read how Campbell explains the journey in “The Hero with a Thousand Faces.”

A hero ventures forth from the world of common day into a region of supernatural wonder: fabulous forces are there encountered and a decisive victory is won: the hero comes back from this mysterious adventure with the power to bestow boons on his fellow man. 

The hero returns from the journey transformed from the rigorous challenges he faced along the way. George Lucas used the Hero’s Journey as a template when writing “Star Wars.” If you would like to learn more about the mythology behind the movie, watch George Lucas’s interview with Bill Moyers.

APOTHEOSIS 

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The Hero’s Journey structure has qualities that can make a story visionary. In the Apotheosis stage, the hero faces death and slays the enemy. The ordeal leads to an expansion of consciousness. Sound familiar? … Continue reading

Using Creative Trance To Write Visionary Fiction – Guest Post by Mary Mackey

A creative trance that allows me to delve into my unconscious whenever I want to, get the material I need for my poems and novels, bring that material up to my waking reality, remember it, and write it down.

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Karan Bajaj and The Yoga of Max’s Discontent

Karan BajajA big welcome to Karan Bajaj, #1 bestselling novelist in India of KEEP OFF THE GRASS (HarperCollins: 2008) and JOHNNY GONE DOWN (HarperCollins: 2010) with more than 200,000 copies of his novels in print. He was selected as one of the “Top 35 Under 35 Indian” by India Today and was nominated for all of India’s top literary awards—the Crossword Book of the Year, Indiaplaza Golden Quill and Teacher’s Indian Achievers Awards (Arts).

I first met Karan in April 2016 when he sent me an email requesting a review of his book, THE YOGA OF MAX’S DISCONTENT, which was to be published by Penguin Random House worldwide in May.

After reading the book’s synopsis, I realized that it fit the genre of visionary fiction. So I agreed to do a review. I also took the opportunity to ask Karan to participate in a Q&A for the Visionary Fiction Alliance.

Imagine my surprise, when THE YOGA OF MAX’S DISCONTENT turned out to be a #1 New Release on Amazon in the Metaphysical and Visionary Fiction category.

As of this writing, THE YOGA OF MAX’S DISCONTENT has the Amazon Best Sellers Rank of #22 in the Kindle Store for Metaphysical/Visionary Fiction category. It also has 243 reviews, 90% of them 5-star.

Good going, Karan!

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The Metaphysics of Lucid Dreaming – Visionary Fiction for Kids, Part 2

The Metaphysics of Lucid Dreaming – Visionary Fiction for Kids
by Brandon Bosse

The Dreams of Phillip AislingPart 2

First, I want to wholeheartedly thank the VFA for the opportunity to share my story and ideas. I am grateful to be able to share my passion. Thank you to my fellow VFA members for the kind words in response to Part 1 of this blog post. If you haven’t read Part 1 yet, I recommend starting there.

Visionary Fiction for Kids

Kids are naturally curious about the world. With the Internet at their fingertips, they are even more informed about the way the world works than any generation before. I think that teens crave new ideas and a deeper understanding of the world around us. That is why I think that young readers are up to the challenge of understanding such complex concepts presented in The Dreams of Phillip Aisling and the Numinous Nagwaagan. I hope that I’ve been successful at taking these concepts and presenting them in an entertaining way.

The VFA is transforming human consciousness, one book at a time, and this transformation is most effective if it starts earlier in life. I think it is important to introduce younger audiences to the ideas in visionary fiction before they become stubborn old adults, set in their ways. This book was a middle-grade/young-adult novel from the onset. Even though it is written for younger readers, it is not over simplified. I think kids are smarter than they are often given credit for. The book presents the metaphysics of dreaming not directly to the … Continue reading

The Metaphysics of Lucid Dreaming – Visionary Fiction for Kids, Part 1

The Metaphysics of Lucid Dreaming – Visionary Fiction for Kids
by Brandon Bosse

The Dreams of Phillip AislingPart 1

There are plenty of books written about lucid dreaming, but most of them are written for the adult reader a]nd aren’t intended for children or young adults. Many younger readers aren’t interested in reading dry, philosophical, non-fiction books and easily get bored. Yet, young readers are nonetheless (often indirectly) exposed to the underlying morality and metaphysical aspects of the fictional stories they read. Taking inspiration from stories like Harry Potter, Matilda, Alice in Wonderland, and Wizard of Oz, I began writing The Dreams of Phillip Aisling in 2007. It is a story designed to introduce younger readers to safe and confident exploration of the rich and exciting world of lucid dreaming. It is told from the perspective of a 13 year old boy who is struggling to understand what his dreams mean. I wanted to present lucid dreaming in an entertaining way that kids would enjoy. Readers of all ages are invited to join Phillip in learning to take control of their dreams. The book also explains, from a kid’s point of view, possible theories about the metaphysics of dreams and how they can be interpreted as glimpses into alternate realities within Hugh Everett’s multiverse.

Lucid dreamingWhat is “Lucid Dreaming” Again?

Before we delve into the metaphysics of dreaming, you may be wondering “what is Continue reading