STEPHEN WEINSTOCK’S THE QARAQ and the MAYA FACTOR, BOOK TWO OF 1001: THE REINCARNATION CHRONICLES is FREE on Kindle from OCT 18-22, 2015.

mayafactor

STEPHEN WEINSTOCK’S THE QARAQ and the MAYA FACTOR, BOOK TWO OF 1001:
THE REINCARNATION CHRONICLES 

FREE on Kindle from OCT 18-22, 2015.

After the events of The Qaraq, Sahara Fleming has accepted that she can recall past lives, along with her qaraq, a group of intertwined souls who come together lifetime after lifetime. Now the distressing Maya Factor splinters their community—stemming from the Hindu “Maya,” the worldly illusion that shields us from visionary awareness, and blocks the qaraq from recalling reincarnation stories.

As the group shatters, Sahara must handle her aggressive husband’s advances to get her back. She enjoys their romance, but sees their reincarnations as visionary terrors.

As memories return, the qaraq discovers shocking links between ancient tombs, the sinister Red Isle, and a seventeenth century coven. Is there a grand vision to their lives? Or is it another layer of Maya that will tear them apart?

Structured as a modern Arabian Nights, Stephen Weinstock’s wildly imaginative 1001 conjures up magical, dark, humorous, and visionary reincarnation stories.

 

PRAISE FOR 1001: THE QARAQ, Book One of The Reincarnation Chronicles

“A love spat between two atomic particles, that tickled me—it could get dangerous!”—Eric Van Lustbader, bestselling author, Jason Bourne, Nicholas Linnear series

 “Stephen Weinstock’s imagination is fevered, surreal, fantastical. It will take you places you never dreamed you would go.” —Barry Jay Kaplan, author, Black Orchid

 “The kind of book that keeps you up later than you intended at night!”

 “Whether you believe in reincarnation or not, this is a book which will expand your universe.”

ABOUT STEPHEN WEINSTOCK

In my past life before 1001, … Continue reading

Fables, Italo Calvino, and Visionary Fiction – guest post by Stephen Weinstock

Stephen vfa postThis summer I saw Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival in Ontario. Teiresias was in drag, the Chorus intoned like gospel churchgoers, and the blind Oedipus appeared in the nude (an email warned us ahead of time). Despite the wonderful theatricality, I was put in mind how powerful the Oedipus myth is, with the oracle, the Sphinx, the plague, and the family tragedy as archetypal components. This great myth raised questions for me: is Sophocles’ drama Visionary Fiction? Here is a character grappling with the nature of Truth and his inner consciousness, blindness and all. This is the theme Sophocles renders, but then is the primal myth Visionary Fiction, a myth that has inspired great minds like Freud to transform human consciousness about our psychic nature?

We know this aspect of myth, of fairy tale, of fable, that they exist as pure story, often innocent on the surface, broad-stroke actions without inner character development or thematic commentary. But scratch a bit of that surface, do the least bit of interpretation, and worlds of meaning emerge, often the kinds of transcendental truth that Visionary Fiction embraces. How then do we include or approach these folkloric narratives, which have no original authors or first editions? They are at once the most visionary of fictions, and not technically fiction at all.

What of fable? On the one hand, this form may be the closest in definition to VF. A fable is a story intended” “to reveal moral or ethical consequences to life’s many choices.” This lesson component to the fable aligns with the higher truths that VF … Continue reading

Two New Arthurian Visionary Fiction Novels – Guest Post by Theresa Crater

“Well now, there’s legends and then there’s

secrets that the legends hide.”

~The Singing Stones

Dolores Ashcroft-Nowicki and T.L. Ashcroft-Nowicki, mother and daughter, have both written new takes on the Arthurian legends in the last few years. Dolores wrote The Singing Stones for her grandson and she plans to write more. T.L.’s first novel of a planned trilogy is entitled Merlin’s Daughter. In each novel, we get a glimpse into the spiritual traditions and teachings behind the Arthurian legends from one of England’s foremost magical families. Dolores studied with W. Earnest Butler, and is the head of the Servants of the Light, the organization founded (now renamed) by Western Mystery Tradition Occultist, Dion Fortune. T.L. grew up in her mother’s magical household, and I’ll just bet learned a couple of things here and there.

Theresa pic1In The Singing Stones, the main character, Thomas Greystone, learns about his life’s destiny to sing awake the standing stones in his ancestral homeland and allow the Once and Future King to return. His mentor, Bald Bessie, an apparently homeless woman who lives in a cave with a Jack Russel terrier, turns out to be no less a personage than—but wait. Should I tell you? Let’s just say she’s a major player in this myth’s cast of characters.

We follow Thomas as he discovers his true heritage, regains his lost manor, evades the Others in the nearby village who are trying to stop him from coming to full consciousness of himself and his role, finds the circle of singing stones that move about from hilltop to hilltop (a portal to other worlds and realms), and … Continue reading

Laying the Foundations of a new Visionary Fiction Sub-genre – Guest Post by Gordon Keirle-Smith

Authors writing in the realm of Visionary Fiction are tremendously privileged in that they are only limited by the scope of their own creativity – or by their ability to connect with a source of inspiration beyond themselves. They also have a tremendous responsibility, for our shifting world desperately needs their unfettered vision and the catalytic catharsis they can bring about by communicating that vision to a wider audience.

The goal

Simply stated, we can say that Visionary Fiction has the power to open up readers’ awareness of broader dimensions, stimulate their imaginations, and create a much-needed relief from the pressures and challenges of our frenetic, “connected” epoch.

One step beyond

Let us imagine for a moment how we could take this further and devise a technique capable of blurring the line between fact and fable sufficiently to suspend disbelief more completely. We would then be free to draw readers into an ethos of meta-reality (transcending normal awareness) so that fiction can morph into perceived truth long enough to cross the threshold of rationality and sow the seeds of visualization. At which point doors can open to even more fascinating possibilities.

Getting there

Noble principles. But how can we reach such a goal? Is it really achievable? The only way of being sure we are making our mark is to closely monitor readers’ feedback and reviews, hoping we can excite comments like these:

Once you have turned the last page, you can return to your linear world, to the safety of those physical or metaphysical explanations for our existence you have always taken for granted. But if you have just read this book, they will never be the same.”

“The book created many questions, which is great. It stretched my mind beyond what I knew. Who can say it is … Continue reading

The Visionary Fiction Revolution – And How Words Can Change the World Part 2 Guest post by Rory Mackay

(Read Part 1 of Rory Mackey’s The Visionary Fiction Revolution here)

We tell stories for a reason 

Mythology, which is storytelling at its most essential level, was not purposeless. It played an important role in shaping and sustaining society and, according to Campbell, had four primary functions. The first was to open the eyes of the individual and awaken a sense of awe, humility and wonder about the very nature of existence; to become aware of an interplay of tangible physical and elusive metaphysical realms.

The second function was cosmological; using stories and metaphor to help people understand the universe around them, making sense of time, space and biology. On a sociological level, mythology was also used as a means of forming and maintaining social connections. Having a shared narrative enabled tribes to stick together, supporting the social order and maintaining customs, beliefs and social norms.

On a more personal level, the tribe’s stories provided signposts for navigating life, sometimes reflected in ritual and rites of passage. The individual was not left to muddle through life without guidance. The epic tales of mythology were used as metaphors for dealing with the challenges and conflicts we face along life’s journey. These stories, properly understood, contained great wisdom and guidance.

Mythological tales were reflections of the human psyche and the conflicts and desires that drive it. The catastrophic battles between heroes and demons, the sacrifices, betrayals, jealously and love were reflections of the forces powering the human mind and heart. Furthermore, as stated before, Campbell believed that they could all be reduced to the same basic pattern, the same essential story: a story of trial, transcendence, rebirth and redemption. It was always a story of overcoming great adversity and conflict and finding that most cherished of all things, the true goal … Continue reading

Stephen Weinstock’s 1001: THE QARAQ, BOOK ONE OF THE REINCARNATION CHRONICLES is free on Kindle from Sept 6-10, 2015

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Stephen Weinstock’s  1001: THE QARAQ, BOOK ONE OF THE REINCARNATION CHRONICLES  is free on Kindle from Sept 6-10, 2015.

Sahara Fleming experiences disturbing visions: reincarnation stories as a Red Isle goddess or in a 4th Century Persian orgy. Sahara dismisses these time travel fantasies as stress. She’s four months pregnant and married to Amar, an emotionally aggressive stockbroker unwilling to be a father.

When a mysterious circle of neighbors plants clues about her visions, Sahara learns they are a qaraq, a group of intertwined souls who come together lifetime after lifetime. At secretive meetings, Sahara hears tales of magic realism and realizes her stormy marriage goes back centuries.

Like a modern Scheherazade, Sahara attempts to save her marriage by sharing the past life stories with Amar. But as her karmic knowledge grows, so does Amar’s jealousy. She must abandon the qaraq or risk losing her family.

Structured as a modern Arabian Nights, Stephen Weinstock’s 1001 conjures up sometimes dark, sometimes humorous reincarnation stories. Distinctive, complex, and wildly imaginative, 1001 asks readers to consider who they really are—or have been.

PRAISE FOR 1001: THE QARAQ, Book One of The Reincarnation Chronicles

“A love spat between two atomic particles, that tickled me—it could get dangerous!”—Eric Van Lustbader, bestselling author, Jason Bourne, Nicholas Linnear series

“Stephen Weinstock’s imagination is fevered, surreal, fantastical. It will take you places you never dreamed you would go.” —Barry Jay Kaplan, author, Black Orchid

“The kind of book that keeps you up later than you intended at night!”

“Whether you believe in reincarnation or not, this is a book which will expand your universe.”

ABOUT STEPHEN WEINSTOCK

Continue reading

The Visionary Fiction Revolution – And How Words Can Change the World, Part 1 – Guest post by Rory Mackay

It’s estimated that nearly 130 million books have been published in modern history. 28 million books are currently in print in English alone. When contemplating writing a book, I can’t help but reflect on these staggering statistics, as indeed I think all authors should. Does the world really need another book to add to those 130 million others? In what way is writing a book going to benefit the world and enhance the lives of its readers? Is there a reason for telling a new story – a need, and a purpose for doing so? If not, then why invest the substantial time and effort in writing a book? If it’s just to make money, then there are certainly easier and less labor intensive ways of doing so – particularly with the market as saturated as it is, with more books published than any time in history and an apparently downward trend in readership.

A changing landscape

The publishing industry is in the threshold of a transformation comparable to the advent of the Gutenberg print press over 500 years ago. The way we read is changing substantially, and the way writers release work is also changing. The advent of digital publishing has resulted in an explosion in the number of books being published. I’ve heard it said that we are experiencing an overproduction of books. The scarcer a commodity the more valuable it is, and indeed vice versa. There are more books to choose from than ever before, and to compete in this wild new literary world, authors and publishers must keep prices rock bottom and increase their output to compensate.

Our 21st century civilization is guilty of the crime of excess, if nothing else. In the current information age, we have more information than we’ll ever know what to do … Continue reading

The Scabbard and the Sword Part II – guest post by Marian A. Lee  

Part II: The Purer Archetype and the Warrior King

The second part of this blog explores the warrior king as the Jungian purer archetype with regard to the Qabalistic understanding of the scabbard and sword and its political application.

King_arthur__KarrMost of us know King Arthur as the courageous “once and future king” destined to unite Great Britain and establish the peaceful kingdom of Camelot by creating the Knights of the Round Table. However by examining his shallow understanding of the scabbard and sword, it is clear that he personifies the Jungian archetype of the Purer, and that this more than anything else shapes his destiny. The Purer is the quintessential “innocent” eternal male-child who acts in the world without thoughtful consideration often possessed of an early realization of deeper spiritual truths which are treated in a casual manner without mature judgment and value. Since Arthur chooses the importance of the sword over the scabbard, he acts like the quintessential Purer, unable to relate to the world with mature self-regulation. The Purer has an overly-developed fantasy life; layers of illusion cover the reality of his situation which is perhaps why he is unable to at first realize Morgan’s trickery in switching Excalibur and its scabbard for those of unequal value. According to Kime, the sword serves the psychological function as the “…main means of communication with the material world”. The end result is the misappropriation of the use of the sword.

The sacred task which Arthur must accomplish is to learn how to use the sword and more importantly when to use it. Discrimination comes with maturity, which the Purer never obtains. … Continue reading

The Scabbard and the Sword Part I – guest post by Marian A. Lee

Part I: The Sacred Warrior King

The first part of this blog discusses Arthur, the sacred warrior king, as the archetypal hero of British legend and his relationship within the Celtic mythological narrative.

More than any other works of fiction, except for fairy tales and mythological narratives, Visionary Fiction makes use of spiritual and psychological archetypes, as well as material symbolism to work on the subconscious in an attempt to bring realization of spiritual truths to the level of consciousness. For my generation (60+) of spiritual travelers it is tempting to think, “Ah, I have it now,” and then tell younger generations what they need to know of this special wisdom in order to “get it”. I would rather approach the wisdom of the scabbard and sword with an attitude of, “I’ve got a piece of the puzzle that I want to share”. Then it’s up to future generations to expand and develop it further to fit their needs and times.

Very little of this world has the staying power of mythology. This is due to its archetypal nature, which is found, as Jung points out, in the collective unconscious of humanity, and is therefore salient to all cultures. Archetypes are primal, such as the great mother/father, warrior, hero, fool, and purer (the eternal male child). Primal archetypes are reinvented and cast in different cultural stories throughout the ages. In western mythology, none is arguably more powerful and pervasive than … Continue reading

Jodine Turner’s The Goddess of the Stars and the Sea series – guest post by Theresa Crater

The Awakening Rebirth of Atlantis jpg

 

Jodine Turner’s Visionary Fiction series traces the reincarnations of a priestess specially called to do the work of the Goddess of the Stars and the Sea, an Ancient One who reawakens when humanity is ready for a dramatic shift in consciousness. The first novel in the series shows us the fall of Atlantis and the rise of Avalon. In The Awakening: Rebirth of Atlantis, Geodran is promised to this special Goddess even before her birth. Her mother, High Priestess Jaquine, has lost babies to miscarriages and does not want a repeat performance. The Goddess of the Stars and the Sea claims Geodran as her own in return for bringing her to term.

Many of us have written about Atlantis and grab up books that reimagine or remember those times as soon as we find them. Turner spends a good deal of time in this civilization, showing us the capitol city with its looming pyramid, and taking us into the countryside where we see the fishing and farming villages, as well as the spreading forests. We get to watch Geodran grow up, be accepted into the temple, and go through some training. The High Priestess, rigid with tradition, has trouble allowing Geodran to meet her Goddess each full moon on the beach. Geodran succeeds. She learns sacred sexual ritual with none other than the son of the Goddess.

But paradise is already falling. The priesthood is corrupt, trying to gain the immortal body of light through force and dark magic, dulling the pyramid’s beacon light and endangering the island. Geodran is directed … Continue reading